Reviews of African Literature

Liberian literature

“Have things changed in Liberia or not?”. A literary review of BLUE CLAY PEOPLE by William Powers (3) of (3)

For those who have lived and worked in Liberia, or for those who are doing so at present, Blue Clay People will seem very close to home and familiar. Many expats (and also a good handful of Liberians) can see themselves in the character of Powers, his thoughts and his experiences will be theirs. Powers…

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“Liberia or my girlfriend?” A literary review of BLUE CLAY PEOPLE by William Powers (2) of (3)

Blue Clay People

Despite a number of negative consequences, Powers also discovers that these same development projects are sometimes capable of providing real help and happiness to local communities. William discovers this by delving deeper into Liberian society, which in turn will allow him to discover various fundamental patterns of this culture such as the importance of the…

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SHOULD LIBERIA HAVE BEEN AN EXAMPLE FOR THE WORLD? Literary review of Helene Cooper’s ‘The House at Sugar Beach’ (5) of (5)

Literary Review - The House Of Sugar Beach 5 of 5 by Helene Cooper

Cooper goes on to express her appreciation for the support and assistance received. Referring to six friends of her, she says “the six of them helped me figure out what I wanted to write, how I wanted to write it, and how to live with myself after I wrote it” (“my Liberian friends and cousins…

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BEING A CONGO IN THE UNITED STATES IS NOT THAT EASY. Literary review of Helene Cooper’s ‘The House at Sugar Beach’ (3 of 5)

Literary Review: The house of Sugar Beach by Helene Cooper 3 of 5

Going back to Helene Cooper’s life, it became considerably more complicated when the Liberian civil war broke out, a factor that forced her to move to the United States, specifically to Knoxville, Tennessee, where her status changed radically, becoming a second-class citizen and realising for the first time that she was black (an Irish boyfriend…

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LIBERIA WAS FOUNDED BY SLAVES. Literary review of Helene Cooper’s ‘The House at Sugar Beach’ (1 of 5)

Literary review of Helene Cooper’s ‘The House at Sugar Beach’ (1 of 5)

The House at Sugar Beach is an autobiographical novel (it may also be considered quite simply a novel) written by the journalist and diplomatic correspondent of the New York Times, Helene Cooper. Cooper is a woman of Liberian origin who, over time, acquired American citizenship. In the novel, Cooper recounts her childhood and adolescence whilst…

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Literary review of Wilton Sankawulo’s Why Nobody Knows When He Will Die. DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOU WILL DIE?

Sankawulo

Why Nobody Knows When He Will Die is a book that consists of ten stories on different subjects of everyday African and Liberian reality, many of which can be extrapolated to the rest of the world (bearing in mind cultural differences). The stories are written in the third person and are narrated in a precise,…

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